Entertainment

S.2 Episode 25: Don’t Fall Prey to these Event Snafus!

This week Charles, Lisa, and Paige sit down and talk about things they see at events that could be avoided.  Check out these tips below:

  1. Audio in your non – general session areas. A lot of times people are so focused on the main room. If you have a large group you need to get them into room fairly quickly and its difficult to do if you don’t have anything guiding them.  Having audio in the hallways or spaces really helps to get them prepared.  It’s not just audio though, we have a client put an LED sign in the spaces with the schedule so people know what is going on.  You can loop sponsors and scheduling.  There are so many opportunities when your audience isn’t sitting in their seats.
  2. Spending too much time and money on the wrong things. People spend thousands on the little trinkets at the table. Does anyone really care what brand it says on it.  A hotel brand is probably good enough, using that money elsewhere can create a greater impact. Get sponsors to cover the cost of things.
  3. Buffet style food. It could work for some events but at an event, some of the largest donors go there later and they could not start the main program because they were still in line at the buffet. It pushed the whole program back. You need to think of timing and making sure everyone is fed. 
  4. Content being ready too late. Many events that have been done year after year with a flow but I’ve realized a lot of times we are getting to the show and are just receiving the content two hours before going live.  That gives everyone anxiety, you don’t have the time to check everything over and make sure it is going to run smoothly. You have to have that time. 
  5. Not having a singular decision maker. A lot of times we work with a board of directors or a group of people, and it is great.  However, when all of those people become the ultimate say, it gets really confusing for vendor relationships and everything. From a vendors perspective it’s important to know who we should listen to or talk to for changes and additions especially on site. 
  6. Don’t hire vendors too late in the game. You might not get the a – team or vendors might not be able to work well together. 

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S.2 Episode 20: Proceed At Your Own Risk: Bronx Zoo Tells All

Mid 1999, Robert, a native New Yorker, decided to dive headfirst into the “events world.” Since then, he has never looked back! After nearly ten years of running events at a prestigious country club, as well as his own event planning company, Robert began to utilize his talents in Manhattan and the Hamptons.

In the beginning, Robert worked in the Meatpacking District for Robbins Wolfe Eventeurs. Not only did he plan many first-class, off-premise events throughout Manhattan, he also sold, planned and executed many of their pristine events at their exclusive premier venues: Rubin Museum of Art; Bridgehampton Tennis and Surf Club; The Ocean Resort at Bath and Tennis in Westhampton Beach; and Discovery Times Square. 

In 2012, Robert was named General Manager of Elegant Affairs Off-Premise Catering & Event Planning. There he oversaw upwards of twenty Managers and 150 employees. During his tenure, he was also able to learn everything there is to know about catering to New York’s Corporate and Social Markets.

Robert then became a part of the talented, growing team of Relish Caterers + Event Planning in 2016; working on numerous projects throughout Manhattan, the Tri-State, and the Hamptons. 

Currently, Robert is now overseeing the Events Department for the Wildlife Conservation Society, optimizing the profits for all of their private events, being held within all of the WCS Parks (Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo, Queens Zoo, Prospect Zoo, and New York Aquarium).

During the earlier years of his career, Robert attained two Bachelor’s of Science Degrees; one in Economics, the other in Business Management.

In Robert’s spare time, he has a passion for networking, the wine country, movies, good books, and cooking. In addition to that he also loves local sports, art, live music; and all else New York has to offer him.

S.2 Episode 19: Big Brands Big Events: And the Unique Approach to Creating the Event

This week Charles and Lisa sit down with Kelli who has worked with many big brands; Facebook, Redbull, Universal Studios to name a few.  With big brands and big events comes big stories!  Hear how these big brands approach their events.

S.2 Episode 15: Should you hire a professional emcee?!

Does having a professional Emcee make a difference for your event?  Is it worth the cost of hiring one?  Charles and Lisa sit down with professional Emcee, Amy McWhirter.  Hear the ways emcee’s make a difference for your event and the tricks they have learned to create engagement!

 

Tell us about you.

 
I started out doing trade shows. I’ve been doing that a long time, then about 4 years ago I started transitioning into doing more corporate events. I absolutely love it, the experience from the corporate trade show world led up to this.  Its the live energy I love so much. It’s a lot more improv and in the moment. Trade shows are usually scripted, we have scrips in the live hosting corporate events but our audience is right there and you are guiding them through.  You gauge the energy level and I get such a thrill out of that. 
 
Here in the twin cities we see a lot of news anchors emcee events. How do you create the connection between you and the clients? How are you introduced?
 
Right off the bat I introduce myself and tell them I will be joining them on the journey. I don’t spend too much time on it, just a couple sentences, it’s really all about them and their event. At the end of the event I do have people coming up and say it was great and engaging and think I work for the company.  That is the goal!
 
What sets the tone for an event?  
 
Meetings ahead of time to plan with the client, figuring out what the messaging is.  The tone can vary between the kinds of audiences. The sales meetings are typically a little more high energy, where as a customer gathering is a little different.
 
How do you build your prices?
 
I build pre-planning into the pricing. I consider it part of rehearsal which is the day before the event and are built together for a day rate. For a corporate meeting for a day it is $4,000-5,000. 
 
In your opinion what makes a great emcee?
 
Energy! Energy is huge, warmth, engaging, charismatic, authentic: those are the things I think make a great host.  
 
My experience with the corporate presenting world goes a long way. I am used to getting immersed in the topic and sounding like an expert. That comes somewhat naturally at this point, part of that is getting familiar with a new client. It goes back to meetings and the content. 
 
How do you balance script vs improv?
 
They have their messaging but I have freedom to make it sound natural and put it in my voice. I either do bullet points or write it out more long form. In the moments there’s a lot of improv. Not changing the messaging but the way it’s delivered, when the people are there vs rehearsing, in the moment it will be different. It just comes alive when the audience is there. You have to be able to read the room and adapt accordingly. 
 
Do you see a lot of companies using employees to emcee and how do you show them the value of hiring a professional?
 
Yes that does happen. If they want to do that, it’s fine.  A professional is a professional for a reason and can handle all those unknowns or unexpected things.  The energy level alone, it’s hard to do that and maintain the energy level. The head of an emcee is in a different place. The employee will have so many other responsibilities and their focus can be pulled during the event. 
 
If I want to interview a few emcees, what kind of things do I need to do to vet them?
 
Do research before even talking to your candidates.  Go to a website for them, look at their testimonials, video clips are huge.  You can see the person in action doing what they do best. Of course talk to them and see how they do one on one and get a personality feel.
 
Do you memorize your script?
 
There are confidence monitors, they are hidden so most people don’t know they are there. I put my notes there.  I carry cards, I rarely need them but they do help especially in an interview or panel on stage. Sometimes the monitor will not be working because a video just played, or they forgot to switch it back. 
 
How do you keep people on time?
 
 Lots of reminders about what’s next and what time to be back for the general session. I point them to the mobile app and reinforce it by having them refer to their app. Things definitely do go long. 
 
What was the most fun moment in your career?
 
I went to host a customer conference in Rome last October. I did not meet the pope!  Honestly a sales meeting I did last month, we had some really fun bits.  We had a trivia game for the sales folks and I wore a crazy rainbow jacket. They played a montage of game shows, including international because we wanted to include all the folks, that was really fun. Then I got to do a song and dance. I am a dancer and I can sing.  And the CEO was so big on me doing a song. “You’re ready for that, you’re going to do that song right?!” It was fun. I put on a top hat and did a little bit from Chorus line, that was super fun!  
 
Has anyone asked you to do anything weird?
 
So far no!  If it really fits with their theme, I will say yes. The wildest I had to get was that colorful jacket. 
 
To get a hold of Amy:
Insta: presenting_amy
 
Instagram: charlesevaneide
eidecomcreative
 
Twitter: TheMeetingMinds