Entrepreneurship

Leaderships & What We Can Do Now

We are told how things have changed, and over and over again, “the new normal” but this week we have a treat. Instead of talking how things have changed, here are things we can and should be doing moving forward. Listen as Adam Mendler joins us this week.

Relationships are Key: Sales in a Post – COVID World

Everybody is in sales, no matter what part of the organization you are in. Mickeli Bedore is a sales expert and joins us to talk about what does sales look like in the current environment.

Candid COVID Conversations with Natasha Miller

On this episode we sat down with Natasha Miller, entrepreneur, speaker, author, and more. She shared all that has changed for her as well as where the industry may be headed.

Patrick Lencioni: Changing how we do “Business” during crisis. COVID-19 special

In this earth shattering episode, best selling author, speaker and world class leader, Patrick Lencioni teaches us that this is not business as usual, but a completely different world. With COVID-19 in the midst of all of us, this global pandemic is reshaping how business is done, and how we treat each other. The worlds leaders are in the spotlight during crisis and its time to shine.

It’s a time for us to look at how we are leading and how we can grow for the future.

One of the things I like to say is that people are going to emerge from this and this will pass. It’s so difficult and we pray for the people who are affected physically. Organizations are going to emerge from this either stronger, because of the way they dealt with this, or weaker. It really is about figuring out how to use this time to improve ourselves. Sometimes we can do this with our customers, sometimes we need to do it internally. There are going to be some people who are going to try to survive and there are others that are going to thrive through this, grow and improve. You can improve during times like this. Find whatever ways you can do to get better. Work on the health of your organization.

A lot of what you talk about is organizational health. Help us to understand what organizational health is.

The health of the organization, we like to explain it as, there’s the smarts of an organization, the health of the organization is how functional it is. Does it avoid and mitigate politics, disfunction, do they lose people because it’s toxic? Are they productive and is moral high? None of this is touchy feely, it’s very tangible and real. We are convinced it is the greatest competitive advantage. The world today, people are pretty smart. None of the organizations I go to, do I find are too dumb to be successful. Are they able to tap into that intelligence by creating a culture, and environment where it’s used, or do they waste their time. It’s why Southwest Airlines has always been better, not because they know more, they created a culture that is their biggest competitive advantage.

There are assessments for health. It’s a qualitative process but can be informed by quantitative items. Here are 4 things a healthy organization does well.
1. Make the leadership team behaviorally cohesive.
2. You have to create clarity.
3. Over communicate
4. Put in place just enough structure.

The most important system is meetings, it holds everything together. There are different kinds of meetings for different purposes.

1. Daily/Regular checkin 10 or 15 meeting (what are you working on, how are you doing?)
2. Happy Hour socialize
3. Disciplined tactical meeting – Let’s go through our goals (60-90 min) twice a week during this time
4. Hangout meeting – you might have a strategic topic and just talk about it (60-90 min)

3 + 4 are very important right now.

The rally cry, explain that.

In the midst of a crisis you need to create a new clarity. People in organizations when things are uncertain they want their leaders to create for them and with them a new sense of temporary clarity for this time. We talk about this thing called the Rallying Cry. Its that one thing that rallies everybody. What’s the one thing that will be different when we emerge from this time?

There’s so many different leadership styles. How should a leader navigate informing a team without causing panic or swinging back and forth?

We are seeing the best in a lot of people. If leaders do the right thing: being vulnerable, human, persistent, and creative: we are pulling out the best in people.

This is a critical time, tell me more about that.

People are going to remember what we do during this time for years. People are going to remember that for years. During the pre crisis time, what you said in a meeting and did it was important but it gets lost in the wash. How we handle this, people will look back ten years from now and remember. It will be a badge of honor and a source of good pride and a good memory, or it’s going to be bad.

How do we stay optimistic?

Isolation makes people fearful. When we isolate it’s hard to be optimistic. Be around other positive people, reach out to them, let them reach out to you. For me personally, I am a follower of Jesus, I know theres a reason for everything. I cannot be afraid, my faith says that.

Pet Peeve: A speaker with a boring talk or a serious conference and nightclub music
Super Power: Stopping the 2 on 1 defense in basketball

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Insta: Charlesevaneide
EideComCreative
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Twitter: The Meeting Minds

Breaking into the Event Industry’s “Micro-Communities”

This week we have a crossover podcast with Will Curran of EventIcons and Endless Events. He shares his journey in the events world and how he used the different event communities to grow his career.  Listen for advice on connecting with those in the tight knit communities that exist in our industry!

Tell us your story.

Started in high school dj-ing backyard parties. Had an obsession for buying cooler speakers and lights, eventually got burnt out when I got to college. I saw these massive high school dances that looked live raves or concerts. By the time I graduated college I had about 75% of the dances. Got burnt out again competition entered and couldn’t beat us on quality so they beat us on price. Started to lose business, we pivoted into corporate A/V and production. Everything we learned from setting up sound systems for big high school dances could be applied to what we do inside of a ball room. Before I knew it, we took the corporate world by storm. Took a lot of what we learned on the marketing side and applied it to content and built a name for ourselves in the content world as well.

You’re tied to the industry associations, talk about the value of being involved in associations and organizations.

I am on the younger side of the industry, when I got involved, I went to my first ILEA meeting and feeling completely outsider-ish, there was a lot of clicks, I was the youngest there and no one felt like there was value there. When we started the company we weren’t involved in any associations. I remember talking about joining and being like no it’s not a value, instead we will take the money and make a blog post. For the longest time I wasn’t involved in any association at all. I didn’t know there was any value in them. It took, out of the blue, when my ILEA chapter reached out for me to be on the board. I wasn’t even a member. I knew the value was being in the board, so I was like I guess I’ll do this. My name is in all the emails sent, that was the value, getting my name in front of every person we were emailing. When I joined I realized there was a lot of value in the deep relationships you built with the board, but also in the ability for you to short cut meeting people as well. You end up getting some perceived authority inside the association as well. I did that for about a year and then I got personally asked to be the president of our ILEA chapter. My first answer was no, I don’t have time. They convinced me. I decided to do it, reshaped my chapter to the thought process that was more focused on tight relationships. We were small we had 10 members, so tiny. I basically became president and reshaped things how I thought it should be and I learned about associations as well. If you look at it as a sales opportunity you are not going to get the full true potential. Instead the opportunities you get are what you put into it. Volunteer on the board, it really helps you a ton. 

Now we got involved with IMEX and partnered with them to do content with them. That’s more of an event than an association. If you put value into something you’re always going to get value back. There’s always these micro communities in these associations that you don’t realize exist. There are always these micro communities you can be attached to and get involved. 

What are lessons you’ve learned along the way?

If you just go in trying to get a sales opportunity it’s not going to go anywhere. Associations are different than they were. It’s where you are going to enhance relationships you have. You need to continue to do the marketing and traditional sales, use associations to build a deep relationship. 

Never let someone say that this is the association to join. Far to often people want to say which one is the best one to join. I do think there are stronger chapters in different areas. Even the small ones also can drive just as much value. 

Don’t be afraid to blur the personal and the professional side of things as well. All the super deep relationships that have benefited me the most were people I was like yeah I guess I’ll let you see me drunk!

What are things you’ve learned along the way to grow a team and lead.

I definitely have a different management approach now, and probably different than most people will have. Our team is fully remote. They where whenever wherever they want to work. I have a huge amount of autonomy I give to my team. We don’t ever get to work over the shoulder of our employees. That is a small tip people can get. Give the autonomy to your team. If you hire responsible people and give them autonomy they flourish. 

Embracing and understanding technology and how you can use it to lead better is also important. I saw this issue when I was in an association. Everyone was using email and we were doing in person monthly meetings. I said no, we’re using slack and were doing weekly video calls instead of these long three hour monthly meetings. I noticed a lot of old school managers pushed back. When it came to the management side, I noticed younger generations of people, or tech savvy peopled thrived to use more efficient tools and more efficient ways to be managed. 

Utilize the internet to learn about more leadership styles. Don’t rely on just traditional seminars and even reading books. Sometimes books can be really delayed. They take years to be published, where if you read a blog post that’s going to be a lot more time sensitive and time appropriate. 

Don’t be afraid to look for people in unconventional locations and roles. A lot of time we get stuck.

What advice do you have for newbies?

Avoid sinking yourself in just the events industry. Don’t always focus on reading publications in the events industry and limiting yourself to what everyone else is looking at. One of the number one tips I hear at the end of our podcast, the most common one is: get inspiration outside of the events industry. Go for a walk, go to museums, and I hear that all the time and see it very true as well. When I look at the trends in the industry and publications we are all talking to ourselves so much. 

Document your work. We are in this day and age where we do so many awesome things but don’t have much to show for it. I should tell myself this tip. We don’t take a lot of photos of our events, but we all do so much awesome work. Invest in learning photography/videographer or partner with one. Early on in your career you’re going to live and die by your work. That was one thing that helped us early on. We had so many professional photos taken. We always took them to our sales meeting the next week and always those pictures alone would sell the show.  As much as you think, I’m not good at marketing, when you’re starting off you have nothing to lose. It’s all on youtube. If you’ve never done something before, people criticize it but they have nothing to criticize because it’s your first work. 

Cause: Search Foundation

Pet Peeves: Ignorance and lack of desire to remove the ignorance

Super Power: Speed, presenting ideas fast.  

Willcurran.com

Insta: Charlesevaneide

EideComCreative

meetingmindspodcast

Twitter: The Meeting Minds