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Building Trust in a Crisis ft. David Horsager

One of our favorite guests is back this week! David Horsager joins us to talk about building trust in a pandemic, how leaders communicate during times of change, and his new book, Trusted Leader.

Tell us about your new book.

I am super excited about it, its called Trusted Leader. It’s a special book to me for many reasons, the Trust Edge came out almost a decade ago, and that book was really research driven and takeaway driven. But this next book is sharable. The first half is a fun engaging parable to shift thinking about trust. And the second half are these new ideas and takeaways that we can use a leaders to build trust right away. 

Okay the book is called “Trusted Leader”, that’s kinda a hot topic in the past year…

Here’s the deal, our fastest opportunity to build trust is in crisis. It’s also our fastest opportunity to lose it. I have watched senior leaders earn trust in this time through their response and I’ve also watched people lose trust in this time. And they lose it or gain it fast. I believe trust is the leading indicator, the only reason you follow a leader is trust, all of the other reasons lag behind. Leadership issues are really trust issues. I’ve seen senior leaders build trust while laying off 2,000 people, and I’ve seen people lose trust that haven’t had to lay off anyone. 

What are some examples of leaders building trust in the pandemic?

Yes, I talk about getting granular to the ‘How’. But change is a time to go back to the ‘Why?’. I’m talking about the ‘why’ of the change. If leaders just communicate the ‘why’ they can garner trust. One senior leader here in Minnesota had to do this. He rolled out the why for change, he got authentic, and shared his hope for hiring everybody back and he basically has now. But even while he laid them off it was a MasterClass in doing it in a trusted way. Leading with empathy and all these things, but sharing the why of the change. You need to over-communciate the ‘why’ in the middle of change. 

When you go through times of uncertainty, how do you deal with that? Ask, what can I do, and then, what should I do first? And in the past year, so many people have been uncertain and need to be asking these questions. One thing a lot of leaders did during this time was getting their priorities down to just one. In times of conflict and change, bring it down to one thing. 

 What does your latest research on trust show?

The 2021 Trust Outlook has just been released.  One of the big findings is to lead with empathy, not just with kindness, but lead the conversation with empathy. To put our feet in other shoes. But, we also have been looking at how to build trust in the midst of remote work. The impact of virtual. Introverts are sharing more, and CEOs were communicating more than they ever had. But everything has a life cycle and people are craving face-to-face. We are in relational human community world, and even introverts are craving face-to-face! What have you found about how to connect?

No matter what, virtual does not replace in-person. I think a big thing now is ramifying virtual events for engagement. But, in general I don’t think there is one great answer. What about you?

In my experience, a lot people think polling is great. But I would throw that out the window- because it gives people the chance to have lag time. If there’s lag that takes away the engagement. I would say chat rooms and breakout rooms are great when they are short. Keeping things fast-paced and engaging. I also like to get people both kinestically and verbally engaged. 

Finally, our team created a website for Meeting Minds listeners it’s www.trustedleaderbook.com/meetingminds

MasterClass trainings are also available! 

Trust is earned everyday and if you do something better everyday leaders can change everything – sales, community, culture, etc. 



Emotional Intelligence for Event Planners ft. Rich Bracken

Did you know that event planners have the fifth-most stressful job in the country? If you can relate to that, make sure you listen to this week’s episode featuring keynote speaker, Rich Bracken. He explains how you can leverage EQ to promote personal and professional happiness.

Ditch Your Business-to-Boring Mentality ft. Tim Glomb

We are bringing in the new year with Tim Glomb, VP of Content and Data at Cheetah Digital! Tim shares how to get outside your comfort zone, fuel creativity, and create a head-turning event. Make sure you check it out!

Make your Virtual Events “Haute”

Liz Lathan knows virtual events, especially how to make them not suck! Listen as she joins us to talk about how to keep your virtual events engaging and fun for the person on the screen.

Event Photographers: Capture the Event without Screwing it up

Is photography at your event worth the investment?  Amy Coppersmith from Coppersmith photography shares why you should have a photographer at your event. We hear how to vet a photographer to make sure they capture images you will use for years to come!

Tell us how you got your start.


I started a long time ago, I will jump forward a few years. About 1999, I started out in families and kids. I actually fell into an internship with Best Buy corporate studios. It was all their Sunday inserts: pictures of blenders microwaves. I met my husband there. I was only in an internship, after 6 weeks I was done. I fell into another studio that did weddings, ended up becoming one of their lead assistant shooters. When she moved I decided to do photography on my own. My husband had opened up Coppersmith Photography in 99. When I first met him he was a commercial photographer, after Best Buy he wanted to start his own. I kind of pulled him into weddings. If I asked him today he wouldn’t want to do them, but back then we had a really good time and he learned a lot of things he didn’t know. 


What brought you back into the corporate world, corporate events?

Brides are insane! I lost the love for it. It wasn’t fair to brides and grooms, and wasn’t” doing justice to what they wanted covered. I was already doing corporate work and loved it, I had three children so it kinda made sense. Corporate is take out the emotion it’s all business. I understand all business and made my life more calm. I liked the clients a lot more. Every event was a little bit different. 

When it comes to events, why would I need a professional photographer?  

Photo and video are vastly different. When it comes to photo vs video I know photo. I don’t know video, people assume they are one in the same, they can be, but it is not. The editing software is completely different, everything is different. The quality and knowledge of a pro is important. When i go into a room I see things that would be great to have a photo of, things others wouldn’t think of. It’s an outside perspective. It’s the small details people don’t think about: taking a picture of someone taking notes. I approach it as creating a stock inventory as well as documenting their event. It’s more versatile that way. Coming from weddings, it helped because they are so heavily detail oriented. Finding those details were a fun scavenger hunt and its the same in corporate. 


If I’m producing an event, at what point do I want to have my photographer booked and whats the cost?

Timeline depends on the season, summer you need to call at least 4-5 months in advance. Winter dates you could call me the day before. I’ve had that happen multiple times in the winter, sometimes that works just fine. If you want your pick of photographers at least 4 months 5 would be fantastic. I create a contract the client signs, it has stipulations of when their payment is due. Every company is different depending on their financial department. Most of the time I have a signed contract and that is enough for corporations to follow through on. I would look at half day vs full day rates. Do you need an entire day covered, or only half a day?  Can you condense things down? There are some events where Monday and Tuesday are exactly the same, do you need a photographer for both days, probably not.  That will tell me how many hours I need to be on site. I have half day, full day, and hourly rates. I will help walk them through what they need. A lot of photographers are $100-250 per hour. Full day rates can be $1500-3000 for a full day (10 hours). For me that does include post production. *This differs for each photographer if post is included or not.

 
How do I vet a photographer?

Communication is so important. The visitors bureau is a great place to start, you can google search corporate photographer. Check out their websites once you have a list, get recommendations or referrals from them. Then you can see if they are legit or not. Another thing, when you look at their website, what type of website is it? If you are corporate you don’t want to go to a website that is all weddings. There are so many of us out there, find the one you can work well with. When it comes down to it there are events we want to do and love and others we don’t. It’s not that different an event from a wedding. But it is a business event versus a personal event. 
Ask them about past events, what have they done? If you have a dignitary coming on stage and need a specific shot ask, How would you handle this?  They should be able to answer that pretty quickly or verify that they are qualified to do it. 

If I have you come and shoot who owns the photos, and who can use them?

With me you get to use them, they are your companies to use within the company. A lot of companies want to share their images with other companies, that is where it gets gray. You’ve payed for them for your marketing, the other company didn’t pay for it for their marketing. You are basically paying for their marketing, why would you do that? In my contract it states who is able to use what and where and why.

Contact Amy Coppersmith:Instagram – CoppersmithPhotographywww.coppersmithphoto.com

Instagram: charlesevaneide

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Twitter: TheMeetingMinds